Computers vs Congress

Apple and McDonalds are doing far better than Congress and insurance companies. Gallup poll last summer gathered public perceptions of various industries and agencies, and asked people to score them as either generally positive or negative. All the sectors that scored positive were in the private sector, with even airlines and banks scooting in under the wire. Every government sector and a few industries closely intertwined with federal protections and regulations scored underwater. This isn’t to say that everything government touches is lousy. That’s just the way people perceive it. In all exchanges – voluntary or otherwise – value is largely based on the desirability of the outcome versus the cost. If the cost is zero, nobody expects much and nobody cares about the brand. If it cost a bundle – be it an iPhone or the IRS – people either see great value and award a great brand score … Continue reading

Cost, Effective

What is effective may not be inexpensive. Then again it may be. I stumbled upon two marketing maven surveys, one that reported how effective some lead generation options were and another on how low cost they were. Coming from two different organizations, there were gaps in what was surveyed and reported, but there was enough connecting tissue to make an intelligent review of B2B promotional options. Before I ramble on too much about the details, what was striking is that options for lead generation in social media never scored in the top half of all options by effectiveness. This isn’t to say that social media is to be avoided, but that as a lead generation tool, it isn’t worth a lot of investment. This will shock many here in Silicon Valley because the endless local mantra is that everything is possible with social media. If it were, then social media … Continue reading